Rising Waters Threaten Bats Home in Texas, Thousands Are Rescued We Still Can’t Believe It

13.09.201813:32

Rising Waters Threaten Bats Home in Texas, Thousands Are Rescued We Still Can’t Believe It

The majority of animal rescue stories coming out after Hurricane Harvey hit are about dogs, cats, horses, and cows.  However, there is another incredible rescue going on now with a much smaller but equally important creature.

About approximate 250,000 bats make Houston their year round home. Bats play a major role in the ecosystem by eating millions of bugs each day.  When the hurricane flood waters rose, many bats lost their homes. Bats that lived under bridges were seen waterlogged and floating along waterways and clinging to water edges.  Many compassionate people took the time to help and fish the bats out of the waters and dry them off.

Amanda Lollar, founder, and president of Bat World Sanctuary headquartered in Arlington, Texas explains, “Normally hurricanes and floods aren’t a big issue for bats because they roost high out of the way, so they’re not typically in jeopardy. But I don’t think anyone expected the waters to rise so high that it would get under the bridge as quickly as it did.”

Bat World to the Rescue

A team of rescuers from Bat World Sanctuary wasted no time in driving to Houston to help the bats. The team has been treating hurt bats and providing food and electrolytes to the little furry creatures. Even after hundreds of bats have been treated and saved, the organization is still getting calls. Lomar explains, “We’re still getting calls about bats who are hanging from screen porches and in people’s yards where they found temporary refuge and are still just too dazed and confused to make their way back.”

Lamar goes on to explain, “The issue here is that once they dry off, they’ve gone several days without food and water, so they’re not strong enough to fly and catch insects.”

The people at Bat Sanctuary aren’t celebrating just yet. They will keep working until it’s over.  “If it takes another week or a month, that’s what we’re going to do. We’re going to stay until we save every Bat that can be saved,”  Lomar said.

Source

Leave a Reply

;-) :| :x :twisted: :smile: :shock: :sad: :roll: :razz: :oops: :o :mrgreen: :lol: :idea: :grin: :evil: :cry: :cool: :arrow: :???: :?: :!:

Rising Waters Threaten Bats Home in Texas, Thousands Are Rescued We Still Can’t Believe It
Adblock
detector